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Hate crime statistics

LGBT+ HATE CRIME | MENRUS.CO.UK Homophobic hate crime reports soar but charges fall | The Guardian | 11 Sep 2019
The number of homophobic hate crimes reported to police have more than doubled in the past five years – yet only 8% result in prosecutions, figures show. Reports of homophobic abuse recorded by UK police forces soared from 5,807 in 2014-15 to 13,530 in 2018-19, according to the data. But the number of prosecutions dropped from 1,157 to 1,058 over the same period – from 20% of all reports to 8%.

Hate crime, England and Wales, 2017 to 2018 | Home Office | 18 Oct 2018
Hate crime, England and Wales, 2015 to 2016 | Home Office | 13 Oct 2016
Hate crime, England and Wales, 2014 to 2015 | Home Office | 15 Oct 2015
Hate crime, England and Wales, 2013 to 2014 | Home Office | 16 Oct 2014
Hate crime, England and Wales, 2012 to 2013 | Home Office | 16 Dec 2013
Hate crime, England and Wales, 2011 to 2012 | Home Office | 13 Sep 2012

Hate crime soars to nearly 100,000 incidents in a year | Huff Post | 16 Oct 2018

HATE CRIME | MENRUS.CO.UKThe Hate Crime Report 2019 | GALOP

The Hate Crime Report 2019 | The Hate Crime Report 2019

In this study, a representative sample of 1,617 people from across the UK answered questions on their beliefs about LGBT+ people.

Overview

  • More than 4 in 5 people said that LGBT+ people should be free to live as they wish. 1 in 20 said that LGBT+ people should not have this freedom
  • 1 in 5 people said being LGBT+ was ‘immoral or against their beliefs’. This rose to 1 in 4 among 18-24 year olds, higher than other age groups
  • 1 in 10 people thought that LGBT+ people were ‘dangerous’ to other people
  • 1 in 10 people said that being LGBT+ could be ‘cured’
  • Around 3 in 5 people responded very positively about having LGBT+ people as neighbours. 1 in 5 people showed reluctance to the idea of LGB+ neighbours, and more than 1 in 4 to trans neighbours
  • 3 in 5 respondents said that they were comfortable with trans people using the public restrooms that they use
  • 5 in 10 people agreed that hate crime has a higher impact than other types of crime and that LGBT+ people modify their behaviour in public to avoid being targeted. However, only 4 in 10 thought that violence against LGBT+ people is a problem in the UK

Conclusion

  • The results of this research demonstrate a gulf between levels of anti-LGBT+ hate crime perceived by survey respondents, and the 9ived experienced of LGBT+ people in the UK. Violence and abuse against LGBT+ people is well-documented, yet this poll suggests a large proportion of people in the UK do not believe that violence against LGBT+ people is a serious problem, or that LGBT+ people modify their behaviour to avoid abuse.
  • A significant proportion of respondents expressed conscious bias against LGBT+ people, believing that LGBT+ people are immoral and/or dangerous, and being uncomfortable with LGBT+ neighbours. The level of actual bias held against LGBT+ people by the British public may in fact be higher even than the findings of this study, as people are sometimes reluctant to express views counter to social norms when surveyed, and many more people may hold unconscious biases.
  • The views expressed by young people in this study also gives rise for serious concern. They were often more negative toward LGBT+ people than their older counterparts. This perhaps indicates that the position of LGBT+ people in society is under threat in future generations. More research into the views and opinions of young people and the reasons for these findings is needed, so that hate crime policy and practice can rise to meet these challenges.

Hate crime against LGBT people in Britain increases by 78 per cent since 2013 | Stonewall

Based on YouGov polling of over 5,000 LGBT people. Click link below for full report.

Hate crime against LGBT people in Britain increases by 78 per cent since 2013 | Stonewall | 7 Sep 2017

  • Hate crime: One in five LGBT people (21 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the last 12 months
  • The number of lesbian, gay and bi people in Britain who have experienced hate crime has increased by 78 per cent in five years, from nine per cent in 2013 to 16 per cent in 2017
  • Two in five trans people (41 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last 12 months
  • Four in five LGBT people (81 per cent) who experienced a hate crime or incident didn’t report it to the police
  • Youth: 33 per cent of 18 to 24-year-old lesbian gay and bi people and over half (56 per cent) of trans young people of the same age, having experienced a hate crime or incident in the last 12 months. Just 12 per cent of these people report it to the police.
  • BAME*: A third of black, Asian and minority ethnic LGBT people (34 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident based on their sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the last 12 months, compared to 20 per cent of white LGBT people
  • Religion: LGBT people of a non-Christian faith were more likely to have experienced hate crime or incident than LGBT people in general, with almost a third (30 per cent) experiencing this in the last 12 months
  • Disability: LGBT disabled people are more likely to have experienced a hate crime or incident based on their sexual orientation and/or gender identity: 27 per cent in the last year compared to 17 per cent of non-disabled LGBT people
  • Safety in public: Three in ten LGBT people (29 per cent) avoid certain streets because they do not feel safe there as an LGBT person. More than a third of LGBT people (36 per cent) don’t feel comfortable walking down the street while holding their partner's hand. This increases to three in five gay men (58 per cent).
  • Housing: One in ten LGBT people looking to rent or buy a home in the last 12 months were discriminated against. This increased to one in four (25 per cent) trans people and almost one in four (24 per cent) black, Asian or minority ethnic (BAME) LGBT people
  • Bars and restaurants: One in six LGBT people (17 per cent) have been discriminated against because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity when visiting a café, restaurant, bar or nightclub in the last year. A third of LGBT people (33 per cent) avoid certain bars and restaurants due to fear of discrimination. This number significantly increases for trans people, half of whom (51 per cent) avoid certain venues.

* black, Asian and minority ethnic (used in the UK to refer to people who are not white) synonym BME Around 20% of the teachers are from BAME backgrounds.

Come Forward | LGBT Hate Crime EU
The project Come Forward: Empowering and supporting victims of anti-LGBT hate crimes is funded by the Rights, Equality and Citizenship Programme (2014-2020) of the European Union

National LGBT Hate Crime Partnership | National LGBT Hate Crime Partnership
The National LGBT Hate Crime Partnership brings together 35 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans (LGBT) organisations from across England, Wales and Scotland. Delivered for the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), the partnership led by the LGBT Consortium aims to increase the reporting of Homophobic, Biphobic and Transphobic Hate Crimes and incidents and improve the support available to those targeted.

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